Sermon

Note: we will post a link to the sermon audio when it becomes available!

As Ritchie shares his sermon, listen and dwell on what you’re hearing. See if the Spirit is guiding you directly in this lesson.

After the sermon, reflect on these questions, either alone or with others:

  1. How would you summarize today’s lesson?

  2. What was your favorite quote or scripture from today?

  3. How does this particular lesson impact your life?
    Is there something you need to hold on to, or let go of? Where do you go from here?

  4. End your reflection time in prayer.

Labyrinth Prayer
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The labyrinth isn’t a specific spiritual discipline, but it can enhance other spiritual disciplines, such as prayers, meditation, or centering. It allows you to “get lost”without actually losing your way.

To use this labyrinth, trace along the path with a pointed object (like a pen) without lifting. Go slowly, and don’t focus on the rest of the maze—just the path in front of you.

While traveling the labyrinth, you can pray, repeat a memorized scripture, meditate, or even sing a song.

Here’s a specific, centering way to practice: As you travel towards the center, release your burdens and worries to God. Once you reach the center, reverse direction and move outwards, asking how God can use you in the world.

If you’d like, you can also practice this spiritual discipline on a full-size labyrinth! St. Francis Episcopal Church in Temple has a labyrinth path you can walk, freely available to the public 24/7, located on the southwest side of their property.

If you don’t feel like traveling, you can also practice this discipline on any walking path. Walk slowly, and once you feel like you’ve traveled far enough, return the way you came.

(The labyrinth design in this booklet was first created in the Chartres Cathedral, built in France in the 13th century.)

To the Least of These

Who will we see at church? Any celebrities? Any movers and shakers—or just the moved and shaken? How many are a little too old for your comfort? Too young? Too rich? Too poor? Too dark-skinned? Too light-skinned? Too traditional? Too progressive? Good grief, who are these people?

But wait—we need to put on these special glasses, the bifocals of self-denial and Christ-realization. Their first field of vision sees “no longer I but Christ.” The second field sees “no longer you but Christ.” Both foci are critically necessary for you and me to see really where we are and whom we are with.

Look now! Is that a holy woman I see? And isn't that man a priest? Look, we're surrounded by royalty! We're in the company of saints, not marble myths but flesh and blood saints. These citizens of God's Kingdom are, in fact, ambassadors of the King. These princes and princesses are heirs of the Kingdom, co-heirs with Christ, timeless, eternal. For these are the very children of God, your sisters, my brothers.

We've gone to Church, you see—not a building of wood or stone, not a program that takes up one hour a week—but to Church, to Zion, to the Temple of God! These are the Chosen People, and every one of them has received adoption into the Family, ordination into the Priesthood, election into the Kingdom, incorporation into the Body, and an invitation, blood engraved, into the Royal Banquet!

What if for some reason you decide that you don't like me at all, that I am generally wrong-headed and offensive? Could your view of me become so severe that even my virtues look to you like vices? Could I, in your eyes, do nothing right even when I am, in fact, doing right? What would you do with me? What if you had to work or worship with me?

But then, what if you could see past all that alienates us? What if God gave you the grace to deny not only your self but my old self as well, to recognize only the Christ within us both? What if—just imagine—you actually could see in me the being that God is re-forming from one degree of glory to the next? What if you could actually see the finished product? Suddenly it's no longer a matter of mere tolerance. Suddenly it is all you can do to resist falling down and worshipping this glorious being! Paul put it this way:

So from now on we view no one from a merely human perspective; In fact, we once looked at Christ in the merely human way, but no longer is that the way we know him. So then, with anyone in Christ, you have a new creature. The old things have passed on by. Now look: they’ve become new!

2 Corinthians 5:16-17

Jesus himself said it with the most dramatic simplicity: “I tell you that just as surely as you did to any member of my family, even the least, you did to me” (Matthew 25:40).

Now we understand why the New Testament places so much emphasis on koinonia, the fellowship of the saints. This sharing, this participation, this partnership, this getting together (in the deepest sense) is far more than the optional icing on the cake of discipleship. Fellowship is essential, because in each brother and sister Christ takes on concrete reality.

You and I are family. We are the church. Whenever we come together, we come, not as two selves but as members, organs of the one body of Christ. If that is true, then I will approach you, then in a state of self-denial and Christ-realization. I am not here to protect my status or promote my agenda. I am here simply to be Jesus to you. I am the vessel, the clay jar; Christ is the content.

I embrace you, then, to honor the Christ in you, the one reality that, for me, eclipses every detail of your mortality. I see your immortality.

Because we both are being transformed into the image of Christ, we don't have to remake each in our own images. We needn’t fear differences of taste, perspective or disposition that might otherwise become barriers between us. Indeed, we celebrate our distinct gifts, talents and personalities, all subject to our sovereign Lord. We show, not passive or indifferent tolerance, but active and invested love.

- Larry Hall, from his book No Longer I

Take a few minutes—without distractions—to reflect on this story. Finish your reflection time in prayer. Pray especially for our church as we see Christ in each other.

Shepherd Stories: Dave Jarratt
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The joy of serving as a Shepherd

From time to time I am asked, "how has shepherding been a blessing?" Often, my simple response is “the opportunities that God gives weekly for relationship.” Over the past six years serving our congregation in this way, God has connected Rebekah and me with numerous others relationally in our walk together with Him in Belton. Some of those connections begin with those who visit BCoC for the first time. Sometimes those connections spring from Christian brothers and sisters sharing their faith, joys and struggles as we learn more of God's Word in a group study or class discussion. Other times, new connections in Christ arise from longtime family trust relationships that cross generations within our congregation. Our children were all raised in the Belton church throughout our Military service, and their lives and faith walks (including ours as a family) were nurtured by the love and encouragement of this body. One of my personal joys comes when younger members connect with us in Christ one-on-one, perhaps because they have seen us connect with their parents or grandparents over the years. As a Shepherd, I find joy daily in walking with fellow Shepherds in seeking after our Savior, learning from God's Word together, and listening for the Spirit's urging so that all of us, of every age, might grow more and more to be fully devoted followers of Jesus. It really is a blessing to recognize that our joy in the Lord comes from sharing His love with others. We truly are one in Christ Jesus.

Your Brother in Christ,

Dave Jarratt

Family Service Night

We’re going to do something different this week!

Instead of having service projects at the BCC building, we want you and your “family”—family, friends, or both!—to take on a service project in the community!

Your family can come up ideas for your service project, but if you’re having trouble thinking of something, here’s a list of potential options:

  • Ronald McDonald House: visit rhmc-temple.com or call Leilani Kitchings at 254-770-0910 for more info.

  • Feed My Sheep Temple: visit feedmysheeptemple.org or call Jim Hornsby at 254-778-6885 for more info.

  • Body of Christ Clinic: visit www.bodyofchristclinic.org or call Donna Dunn at 254-939-9500 for more info.

  • Bake cookies and bring them to your local fire station, police station, or hospital.

  • Pick up trash at a local park or cemetery.

  • Create “blessing bags” and find someone who needs it.

  • Make fleece blankets and take them to a local shelter.

  • Drive to different schools and pray for the students and staff who will be there next year.

Email us at worship@beltonchurch.org and let us know what you did and how it went! (Or post a picture on Facebook!)

The Holy Spirit

Today, we’d like you to watch the video entitled “The Holy Spirit” by The Bible Project:

Reflect on this video below:

  1. What did you hear/see in this video that was new to you?

  2. Jon and Tim say, “Today, the Spirit is still hovering in dark places … pointing people to Jesus, transforming and empowering them so they can love God and others.” How has the Holy Spirit been at work in your life?

Read and reflect on Romans 8:1-14 (NIV):

Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus, because through Christ Jesus the law of the Spirit who gives lifehas set you free from the law of sin and death. For what the law was powerless to do because it was weakened by the flesh, God did by sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh to be a sin offering.And so he condemned sin in the flesh, in order that the righteous requirement of the law might be fully met in us, who do not live according to the flesh but according to the Spirit.

Those who live according to the flesh have their minds set on what the flesh desires; but those who live in accordance with the Spirit have their minds set on what the Spirit desires. The mind governed by the flesh is death, but the mind governed by the Spirit is life and peace. The mind governed by the flesh is hostile to God; it does not submit to God’s law, nor can it do so. Those who are in the realm of the flesh cannot please God.

You, however, are not in the realm of the flesh but are in the realm of the Spirit, if indeed the Spirit of God lives in you. And if anyone does not have the Spirit of Christ, they do not belong to Christ. But if Christ is in you, then even though your body is subject to death because of sin, the Spirit gives life because of righteousness. And if the Spirit of him who raised Jesus from the dead is living in you, he who raised Christ from the dead will also give life to your mortal bodies because of his Spirit who lives in you.

Therefore, brothers and sisters, we have an obligation—but it is not to the flesh, to live according to it. For if you live according to the flesh, you will die; but if by the Spirit you put to death the misdeeds of the body, you will live.

For those who are led by the Spirit of God are the children of God.

Jace & Bekah Allen
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Jace & Bekah are graduates of Texas A&M and participated in missions with Aggies for Christ. Jace is trained in marriage and family counseling and is currently working on an online Master’s degree in counseling. He serves as the director of Living Well, a Christian inter-agency non-profit cooperative that provides training, assessment, counseling, and opportunities for US missionaries living and working in Cambodia. Their aim is to provide holistic support and education, to serve those who serve. They desire to provide resources and support to organizations, individuals, couples, and families to help them “live well” while in Cambodia. Jace believes God has been preparing him for this opportunity to be able to make disciples through his access to many families who are working in Cambodia. As part of that ministry, Jace and Bekah were recently asked to minister a Cambodian church to speak to their young families about developing a Christian culture in their home. Because most Christians in Cambodia are first-generation Christians, they have very little experience in many areas of Christian living. Jace and Bekah have also been asked to directly minister to a group of missionaries living and working in Cambodia.

Bekah has always been interested in non-profits working against human trafficking and helping with women who are abused. Because of that interest, Bekah quickly became involved in setting up Bible studies in a women’s prison in Phnom Penh. This group has been very receptive to the gospel. Their study group has grown rapidly and the influence of her students has begun to impact some of guards as well. Many of these women have now become teachers themselves. There have been a number of baptisms. While Bekah was away in Thailand for her most recent maternity care, there were several new disciples who took over to teach the classes for Bekah.

Recently, the president of Cambodia made a decision to release a large number of women prisoners to relieve over-crowding in the prisons. Now, many of these new disciples will be going back to their homes where they can carry the gospel to their own families and friends.

Take a few minutes to reflect on this ministry we support. Finish your reflection time in prayer. Pray especially for Jace & Bekah and the people of Cambodia.

Sermon

Note: we will post a link to the sermon audio when it becomes available!

As Ritchie shares his sermon, listen and dwell on what you’re hearing. See if the Spirit is guiding you directly in this lesson.

After the sermon, reflect on these questions, either alone or with others:

  1. How would you summarize today’s lesson?

  2. What was your favorite quote or scripture from today?

  3. How does this particular lesson impact your life?
    Is there something you need to hold on to, or let go of? Where do you go from here?

  4. End your reflection time in prayer.

Fasting

It is a wonderful blessing that we rarely go hungry. But in our age of plenty, we can also develop large appetites…for food, and also for comfort. We can become addicted to comfort.

The spiritual discipline of fasting invites us to practice self-denial. And somehow, this physical denial frees us, allowing a spiritual feast. The Bible is full of examples of fasting. In fact, Jesus assumes his followers will practice giving, praying…and fasting (Matthew 6:1-18). Yet it’s unfamiliar to most of us.

Richard Foster writes, “More than any other Discipline, fasting reveals the things that control us … We cover up what is inside us with food and other good things, but in fasting these things surface … We can rejoice in this knowledge because we know that healing is available through the power of Christ.”

If your physical health permits, we encourage you to try a “meal-to-meal” fast of 24 hours or so. Begin a fast (of food) following an early supper, then break your fast the next day with a late supper. (Alternatively, you can fast from other comforts, like social media or television.) Do not dwell on your fasting, but instead focus on seeking God’s will during your times of hunger. Feed your soul.

We recommend that children fast from screen time, not food. They can replace that time with prayer or Bible reading.

Fellowship of Believers

When I was in high school, I had only one friend who was a follower of Christ. That friend lived 2½ hours away, and I only saw her about once a month. It should be no surprise, then, that my spiritual life throughout high school was almost non-existent.

Fast forward to my freshman year of college at Harding University. For the very first time in my life, I was surrounded by and living with people who knew Jesus and were making an effort to love and follow Him. This change of scenery radically changed my life. I began reading my Bible—not just to memorize a verse or two, but actually reading it. I started praying—not just before meals, but actually coming before the throne of the God who created everything, spilling my guts and rejoicing in His holiness. I began confessing my sins—repenting from all of those years of lukewarm living and comparing my sins to those of my unbelieving friends rather than Jesus. I began making disciples—as these women who were further along in the faith poured into me, I realized I had a life full of friends and family back home who needed the life-changing power of Jesus that I had just discovered.

I believe this is the power God intended for His Church. God did not design us to do life alone, without the fellowship of believers, but He used the Body of Christ to spur me on to be a doer of the Word and not a hearer only. Since my time at Harding, my husband and I have moved many times, and it is our ambition to find this kind of fellowship wherever we are. And here in Texas, it is my joy to say we have found it at Belton Church of Christ within our small group.

And they devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers. And awe came upon every soul, and many wonders and signs were being done through the apostles. And all who believed were together and had all things in common. And they were selling their possessions and belongings and distributing the proceeds to all, as any had need. And day by day, attending the temple together and breaking bread in their homes, they received their food with glad and generous hearts, praising God and having favor with all the people. And the Lord added to their number day by day those who were being saved.

Acts 2:42-47

- Whitney Striclyn

Take a few minutes—without distractions—to reflect on this story. Finish your reflection time in prayer. Pray especially for our small groups here at BCC, and if you’re not in one currently, consider joining one soon.

Shepherd Stories: Mark Groveunder
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What's it been like, being a shepherd of a church?

It has been a true blessing to be a shepherd at BCC. I have been amazed at the positive feedback and words of encouragement I have received. It is not easy to please everyone. But based on the feedback I have received, we seem to be headed in the right direction. It is often a challenge for us as shepherds to be everywhere because each of us has full-time jobs, and for me, that often includes travel. But this also highlights one of our objectives, which is to increase the breadth and depth of our volunteers. We want to empower them to do that which we believe God has called us to do. We have seen tremendous growth at BCC—not just in the number of people, but also in our spiritual development. I look forward to seeing what else God has in store for us as individuals and as a group called the Belton Church of Christ.

Take a few minutes—without distractions—to reflect on this story. Finish your reflection time in prayer. Please pray especially for our Shepherds, as they continue to lead us.

BCC Service Night

This Wednesday, like last Wednesday, we’ll be working around the building, taking care of some projects that could use multiple helpers. Tonight, we’ll be focusing most of our work on helping prepare for Camp Koinonia.

To help coordinate our efforts, please check-in at the gym, where you’ll be assigned a project. Here are some of the projects we’re hoping to accomplish tonight:

  • Cleaning the Travel Trailers

  • Cleaning and loading chairs

  • Helping prepare materials for Journey Groups

  • Preparing game supplies

Sacrifice & Atonement

Today, we’d like you to watch the video entitled “Sacrifice & Atonement” by The Bible Project:

Reflect on this video below:

  1. What did you hear/see in this video that was new to you? (Did anything remind you of what you heard in Ritchie’s “Nothing but the Blood sermon series?)

  2. Tim and Jon say, “The evil I see out there is the same evil that’s inside of me … if God’s going to rid the world of evil, he’ll have to get rid of us.” Are we more gracious with ourselves than we are with others?

Read and reflect on Ephesians 2:1-10 (NIV):

As for you, you were dead in your transgressions and sins, in which you used to live when you followed the ways of this world and of the ruler of the kingdom of the air, the spirit who is now at work in those who are disobedient. All of us also lived among them at one time, gratifying the cravings of our flesh and following its desires and thoughts. Like the rest, we were by nature deserving of wrath. But because of his great love for us, God, who is rich in mercy, made us alive with Christ even when we were dead in transgressions—it is by grace you have been saved. And God raised us up with Christ and seated us with him in the heavenly realms in Christ Jesus, in order that in the coming ages he might show the incomparable riches of his grace, expressed in his kindness to us in Christ Jesus. For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God— not by works, so that no one can boast. For we are God’s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.As for you, you were dead in your transgressions and sins, in which you used to live when you followed the ways of this world and of the ruler of the kingdom of the air, the spirit who is now at work in those who are disobedient. All of us also lived among them at one time, gratifying the cravings of our flesh and following its desires and thoughts. Like the rest, we were by nature deserving of wrath. But because of his great love for us, God, who is rich in mercy, made us alive with Christ even when we were dead in transgressions—it is by grace you have been saved. And God raised us up with Christ and seated us with him in the heavenly realms in Christ Jesus, in order that in the coming ages he might show the incomparable riches of his grace, expressed in his kindness to us in Christ Jesus. For it is by grace you have been saved,through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God— not by works, so that no one can boast. For we are God’s handiwork, createdin Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.

Camp Koinonia
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“Camp K” began in 1975 as a way to reach teens in Central Texas. Our church partners with area churches, and we invite teens throughout the area to join us.

Koinonia is a Greek word meaning “fellowship,” and Camp K is all about fellowship. Relationships built at camp have lasted for years. Even more importantly, relationships with the Lord Jesus Christ have been challenged, changed, strengthened, built, developed, reinforced, and encouraged for a lifetime of service to the kingdom of God.

Camp K will begin Senior Week on June 23 and Junior Week on June 30. If you’d like to help us prepare for Camp K, you can come this Wednesday night for a special service night!

Take a few minutes—without distractions—to reflect on the ministry of Camp Koinonia. Think about those you know who will be attending or serving this year. Pray for them. Pray also for the “new” students at Camp K—those who haven’t yet learned about the love of Jesus Christ.

Sermon

Note: we will post a link to the sermon audio when it becomes available!

As Don shares his sermon, listen and dwell on what you’re hearing. See if the Spirit is guiding you directly in this lesson.

After the sermon, reflect on these questions, either alone or with others:

  1. How would you summarize today’s lesson?

  2. What was your favorite quote or scripture from today?

  3. How does this particular lesson impact your life?
    Is there something you need to hold on to, or let go of? Where do you go from here?

  4. End your reflection time in prayer.

Examen ("Examination")
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Too often, we go through our day, unaware of the world around us, unaware of God, and even unaware of ourselves.

The spiritual discipline of examen is one way we can pay more attention, to notice God and your God-given desires.

Find a quiet moment to reflect on the events of your day. Ask these questions (or similar ones):

  • When did I give love? When did I withhold love?

  • When did I feel energized? When did I feel low?

  • Where did I see God at work today? Did I notice it while it was happening, or only afterward?

  • What emotions did I experience today? Are those emotions telling me something I need to hear?

  • What should I be grateful for? What were God’s gifts in my life today, big or small?

  • What is one thing from today I feel called to pray about? What should I pray about as I prepare for tomorrow?

Families with young children: you can practice some of these questions at meals or at bedtime.

  • “I spy God” – where did you see God at work today?

  • “Rose, thorn, bud” – what was something good that happened today? Something sad? What are you looking forward to tomorrow?

Mission Trips

Gracie jumps out of the van as it finally arrives in La Laguna, Mexico, and races toward the tiny girl standing beside her dad on the steps of the church. Gracie, five years old, takes the gum out of her mouth and sticks it into the mouth of the smaller child, who chews and grins. Yanet takes it out of her mouth and puts it back into Gracie’s, and I think, “Okay, then. God? A little help here?” Neither little girl seems to suffer any ill effects at all.

Welcome to the world of missions.

We’ve just heard gunshots out in the streets of El Progreso, Honduras, and yet the children on the patio don’t even seem to notice. They see us with big bags of candy, but instead of crowding toward us, they turn and run to sit at picnic tables, watching us with big eyes and smiles. We pass among the tables and place a small pile of candies in front of each one, smiling at each other when one little boy looks up from his three Tootsie Rolls and screams, “Cho-co-lahhhh-te!” An older child nearby raises her hand and asks me a question in Spanish, pointing to a tiny boy beside her. “We all have five pieces and he only got three. Do we need to give him some of ours?”

There’s no better experience of koinonia, that wonderful fellowship that makes us church, than a mission trip with the Belton Church of Christ. My best memories and lessons in love are snapshots, moments from mission trips that opened my eyes to the deep, sweet bliss of souls with their Savior.

Our last day in the little town of Nuevo Padilla, we decide to go out to the lake, a man-made body of water not quite covering the last remains of Viejo Padilla, the little village flooded to make the new lake. A few families are camping there, cooking fish and scattered around the edges of an old and beautiful building, which had been a school a hundred years before. Teenagers were lounging around the old porticoes, listening to a boom box blasting, “La Macarena.” Our own teens jump out of the vans, run to the porch, and make a line, going through the motions of the song with the Mexican teenagers dancing there. Grins came out, high fives exchanged, and we smiled for the rest of the day.

Each of us felt valuable, each as important for what we could contribute as the next, and safe together. My language skills were nice, but Mickey’s quick way of setting up my tent was much more important to me after a long day of travel. Rodney’s cooking skills and shopping in foreign markets were the most important thing of all, at some point. Teens ran wild with children, playing long past what I could have done. Dick and his helpers brought desperately needed medical attention and eyecare resources; Don made construction jobs easy, Donna did VBS perfectly…the list goes on.

We shot potatoes across the canyon with a potato cannon, jumped around on pogo sticks which we left for the village to enjoy, poured concrete floors, visited the sick, gave away candy, crayons, and clothes. One year we outfitted a whole village with new shoes. The children enchanted us, the ladies fed us, and God’s guardian angels guided us. We drove through breath-taking mountains on narrow, hairpin turns, and stopped to sing in the open-air mountain chapel where truckers and travelers lit candles at shrines for safe passage. We run into the Gulf of Mexico waves, Allen holding a tiny Gracie close as they ride up high on the rushing waters, enjoying her shrieks of just too much fun.

I wish everyone could be part of a mission trip.

Bruce leads us into the rain forest terrain, where we zipline across deep green canyons, leaving trails of terror and tremors in the sky behind us, mostly grinning and finally relieved to be on tierra firma again. We work. We’re all of different ages and life stages; it doesn’t matter. We love each other fiercely and treasure up every single moment we have together.

When we get home, my guardian angels check into some heavenly rehab somewhere to rest, my husband does mountains of laundry, and I unpack souvenir coffee from every tiny crevasse of my luggage. My heart has stretched to make even more room for my fellow travelers and the people we met, who will forever stay in our prayers. I am so grateful. So blessed.

- Jane Gibson

Take a few minutes—without distractions—to reflect on this story. Finish your reflection time in prayer. Pray especially for the people of Honduras, and the work of Mission Upreach.

You can find more information about Mission Upreach online at missionupreach.org.

Shepherd Stories: Scott Cox

Church family,

God is at work at BCC. God is at work around the world through the missionaries we support. God is at work through our ministers and staff and the work they do each day. God is at work through your acts of service and the lives that you touch. I am thankful for our former shepherds, for their hearts of service and the way God continues to use them in ministry. We are blessed to live in a community that provides a positive environment for families. Yet many of our neighbors have struggles, and many do not know Jesus. There is much work still to be done, and I believe God has bigger plans for BCC. As we prayerfully consider plans to execute our growing young initiative over the coming months, I ask for your prayers for wisdom and God’s direction. I also ask that you consider how you will serve. We anticipate there will be expanded opportunities for service, and we solicit everyone’s participation. Together, with God’s help, we can touch many lives with the good news of the gospel.

In closing, I want to thank you for your support and encouragement. Thank you for your financial support that has enabled us to meet our budget thus far. Thank you for the way you step up when needs are made known. I am humbled to serve as one of your shepherds, and it is a privilege to serve with my fellow shepherds. May we always seek to do His will, and may we always be light unto a dark world.

Take a few minutes—without distractions—to reflect on this story. Finish your reflection time in prayer. Please pray especially for our Shepherds, as they continue to lead us.

BCC Service Night

This Wednesday and next Wednesday, we’ll be working around the building, taking care of some projects that could use multiple helpers. We’ll also help prepare some materials for the upcoming sessions of Camp Koinonia.

Here are some ways you can serve tonight:

  • Help clean and tidy the Women’s Ministry closets

  • Mow and edge our yards

  • Trim trees

  • Help clean out the attic

  • Clean out gutters

  • Paint the gym door

  • Revitalize the flowerbeds

  • Spot-clean carpets

Holiness

Today, we’d like you to watch the video entitled “Holiness” by The Bible Project:

Reflect on this video below:

  1. What did you hear/see in this video that was new to you?

  2. Tim describes God’s holiness as so good, it’s dangerous to be around if we are impure. What does it mean to you, that Jesus has made us pure enough to be with God?

  3. How do we, like Jesus, bring God’s kingdom into a world filled with sin?

Read and reflect on Exodus 3:1-6 (NIV):

Now Moses was tending the flock of Jethro his father-in-law, the priest of Midian, and he led the flock to the far side of the wilderness and came to Horeb, the mountain of God. There the angel of the Lord appeared to him in flames of fire from within a bush. Moses saw that though the bush was on fire it did not burn up. So Moses thought, “I will go over and see this strange sight—why the bush does not burn up.”

When the Lord saw that he had gone over to look, God called to him from within the bush, “Moses! Moses!”

And Moses said, “Here I am.”

“Do not come any closer,” God said. “Take off your sandals, for the place where you are standing is holy ground.” Then he said, “I am the God of your father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob.” At this, Moses hid his face, because he was afraid to look at God.

Read and reflect on 1 Peter 1:14-16 (NIV):

As obedient children, do not conform to the evil desires you had when you lived in ignorance. But just as he who called you is holy, so be holy in all you do; for it is written: “Be holy, because I am holy.”